Celtics’ Rasheed Wallace Kicks Back With Kids in the Classroom

Celtics' Rasheed Wallace Kicks Back With Kids in the Classroom New Celtics addition Rasheed Wallace may not know much about his new surroundings, but at least he has some friends.

The forward-center spent his Tuesday afternoon reading to students from the Dotwell after-school program as part of the Read to Achieve program, according to Boston.com. Afterward, he joined the kids on a duck boat tour of the city.

"Every kid likes to be read to, or even just have an adult play with them a lot, even if it's girls with tea parties or boys playing in the dirt," Wallace said. "It's all part of being a kid. It's something we all want to do."

The 14-year veteran, often viewed as somewhat of an instigator throughout the league, isn't interested in what the charity work is doing for his image. That isn't his motivation. 

"A lot of people have seen [this side of me]," he said. "Like I said, I do this with and without the NBA. My wife and I do it sometimes. I do it with my own kids sometimes, so it's all cool."

Wallace said he did similar charity work in Detroit and wanted to further his efforts as he got accustomed to life in Boston.

"I wanted to continue what I did in Detroit, what I did in Portland, what I do in Philadelphia, North Carolina, and what I did in Washington when I was there with the Bullets many moons ago," Wallace said. "It's something the kids look forward to, you know, to have a professional athlete — football, baseball, basketball, whatever — come to their school and watch them interact, and interact with them."

Wallace hasn't been in town for long, and he still has a lot to learn about what it's like to call Beantown his home — but he's looking forward to life here, on and off the court.

"I don't know too much about the city," he said. "I don't know, you know, the best restaurants and all that stuff, but I'm pretty sure the guys on the team will tell me."