Steve Williams Says Tiger Woods Should Have Been Disqualified for Illegal Drop at The Masters

Masters GolfThe divorce between Tiger Woods and former caddy Steve Williams wasn’t pretty, and now Williams is adding more fuel to the fire.

After winning 13 major tournaments on Woods’ bag, Williams won his first caddying for Adam Scott at The Masters last weekend. However, finishing above Woods didn’t stop Williams from weighing in on the controversial illegal drop and triple bogey that Woods took on the 15th hole in Round 2.

According to Williams, Woods should have been disqualified.

“From what I can gather, he took an illegal drop, signed a scorecard and left the course,” Williams told a television station in his native New Zealand, according to ESPN. “Under most circumstances that would result in disqualification. … If the rules of golf are upheld, I believe he should have been disqualified.”

The issue at hand is whether Woods should have been disqualified for signing and submitting an incorrect scorecard after his second round. Woods was let off the hook thanks to the little-cited rule 33-7 — since Woods wasn’t informed about a possible infraction by the rules committee before signing his card, he was not disqualified.

Despite thinking his former employer should have been disqualified, Williams doesn’t necessarily think Woods was trying to get a leg up on the competition. He also doesn’t think that a television viewer — The Masters was tipped off about the infraction by a phone call from a viewer — should be able to affect the outcome of a golf tournament.

“I don’t think people should be able to phone in and have any kind of effect on a golf tournament,” Williams said. “I don’t think people should be able to sit back and have an outcome on a tournament.

“Tiger certainly wasn’t trying to gain anything on the field there. Obviously he was frustrated and he mistook the rule between a red line and a yellow line and where you can drop. … It was a mistake.”

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