Red Sox Nation Remembers ‘Voice of Fenway Park’ After Announcer Carl Beane Dies of Heart Attack in Car Crash

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Red Sox Nation Remembers 'Voice of Fenway Park' After Announcer Carl Beane Dies of Heart Attack in Car CrashBaseball lost one of its pre-eminent voices Wednesday.

Carl Beane, the "Voice of Fenway Park" since 2003 and the lead-off voice in "The Baseball Experience" at the Hall of Fame, died in a car crash in Sturbridge, Mass., after having a heart attack.

"We are filled with sadness at this tragic news," Red Sox President and CEO Larry Lucchino said. "No one loved his role with the Red Sox more than Carl did his. He adored the opportunity to pay homage each game to Sherm Feller, and to contribute to the culture of Fenway Park, a place he loved passionately. His legion of friends with the Red Sox and the media will miss him enormously, and all of Red Sox Nation will remember his presence, his warmth and his voice."

The Red Sox will honor Beane at pregame ceremonies Thursday when the Cleveland Indians visit Fenway Park, according to a Red Sox press release.

"My thoughts and prayers go out to the family of Carl Beane," David Ortiz tweeted Wednesday afternoon. "Stepping up to the plate at Fenway won't be the same."

Beane was a native New Englander who came to the announcing job at Fenway Park after a career in radio.

"I've been coming to this ballpark for 54 years, as a kid, a reporter for 35 and now, this job for nine years," Beane said in an interview with USA Today last year. "This is the job of a lifetime for me. What could be better — especially on the 100th anniversary of this place? I think that is the coolest thing. There aren't many things one can celebrate that have all the history that Fenway does."

Beane first got his job when he heard the team was looking for an announcer after the new ownership group came in. He made a call saying he'd like a try at it and was given the role after a spring training tryout.

"The only bad part about this job is when the season ends," he told USA Today.

He was born and raised in Agawam, Maine, and worked at several Massachusetts radio stations throughout the years as well as providing national updates for ESPN Radio, Sirius Satellite Radio, Westwood One and The Associated Press.

Beane also taught classes in play-by-play and sports broadcasting at the Connecticut School of Broadcasting in Needham, Mass. He was involved in local nonprofit causes, including being the national spokesman for the American Diabetes Association at one time and narrating for Talking Books at the Perkins School for the Blind.

Beane's family is asking that any contributions in his memory be made to the Holland Congregational Church Building Fund and the American Diabetes Association.

Photo via Twitter/@fkelly1

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