For what feels like forever, Anthony Davis has been the apple of the Boston Celtics (or at least their fans’) eyes.

But the rumors have quieted ever since Davis led his New Orleans Pelicans to the second round of the NBA playoffs, as many believe the successful run was enough to keep the All-Star forward happy. So, if the Celtics enter the offseason looking to execute another blockbuster trade, who might they set their sights on?

During a recent appearance on Zach Lowe’s “The Lowe Podcast,” ESPN’s Brian Windhorst revealed there might be trouble in paradise between the Minnesota Timberwolves and forward Karl-Anthony Towns. And if the situation doesn’t improve, Windhorst believes the Celtics should make a run at the 22-year-old phenom.

“I don’t think Anthony Davis is going anywhere any time soon,” Windhorst said. “Karl Towns, that might be a different story.”

“I said on some podcast recently that I just have a gut feeling that something crazy is going to happen there this summer,” Lowe said. “It’s not in a good place right now internally.”

The Celtics currently hold a 2-0 lead over the Cleveland Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference finals, and its’ hard to look at them and think a big move needs to be made. Furthermore, the returns of Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward next season essentially will represent Boston’s major offseason additions.

“(The Celtics) want to see what the team is,” Lowe said. “And they’re not going to trade anybody until they face – they’re not going to trade anyone unless a crazy offer just walks into their lap.”

Still, Towns is a freak. Through three seasons, the former Kentucky Wildcat has averaged 21.6 points, 11.7 rebounds, 2.4 assists and 1.4 blocks per game. Oh, and he’s a career .387 percent 3-point shooter, despite being 7-foot-0.

“If I were the Celtics, I would make a quiet call to Minnesota,” Windhorst said.

The question, of course, is how much is too much for a player like Towns, or even Davis? Let the debating begin.

Thumbnail photo via Brace Hemmelgarn/USA TODAY Sports Images