You’ve probably noticed a pitcher checking out the inside of his hat during or between batters while he’s on the mound.

But have you ever wondered what they’re looking at? It’s essentially a scouting report of the opponents’ lineup. But for Boston Red Sox, he’s usually “locked in” beforehand.

“Honestly, I’m pretty locked in on what I want to do to guys,” Porcello told The Boston Globe’s Alex Speier. “Really, most nights for me now, at this point, if I’m not being successful, it’s because I’m not executing the pitches that I want to throw, not because I don’t know what to throw.

“You have so much information you want to use to your benefit, but it’s a game played by humans,” he added. “Sometimes those scouting reports go out the window when you throw a pitch where you think you want to throw it and the guy is all over you. Now you’ve got to make an adjustment back. That’s the game.”

It also is used as a tool to help get on the same page as the catcher, especially if Sandy Leon replaces Christian Vazquez in the middle of the game or vice versa.

“It’s just easier to get on the same page as the catcher quickly instead of using 20 different signs,” Eduardo Rodriguez said. “It’s one sign, see it. It’s easy and quicker.”

Hey, whatever helps a pitcher attack a lineup.

Click here to read Speier’s entire article >>>

Thumbnail photo via Kevin Sousa/USA TODAY Sports Images