Bill Belichick’s sweatshirts almost are as synonymous as his monotone voice whenever he’s impersonated.

Does he cut the sleeves off his hoodies himself? Why did the New England Patriots head coach start doing it in the first place? What is with the fashion statement?

Well, Tom E. Curran of NBC Sports Boston laid out the origin of Belichick’s signature sweatshirt style. Here’s what he had to say:

Belichick was driven to distraction by his sleeves in the Patriots Super Bowl XXXIX win over the Eagles. Belichick was just fiddling and tugging and tucking until finally he rolled them up inside themselves. The next season, Belichick took action. In the fall of 2005, Belichick walked into the team’s equipment room, laid a gray sweatshirt on a table and he then lobbed off both arms right below the elbow.

The reasoning behind this strange act?

“My arms are too short,” Belichick reportedly told someone in the equipment room, via Curran.

But while the “customized” sweatshirts have become part of his signature look, it may not help the Patriots any in the postseason if their coach no longer is being annoyed by his sleeves.

As noted by Curran, from 2005 through 2012, every single New England playoff loss came when Belichick was donning a cut-off hoodie.

Let’s maybe keep it in the closet for all future postseason games.

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