Randy Moss Doesn’t ‘Feel Wanted,’ Expresses Frustration With Patriots Over Contract

Randy Moss Doesn't 'Feel Wanted,' Expresses Frustration With Patriots Over Contract For three years, Patriots fans have pretty much seen Randy Moss at his best behavior. That might change in 2010.

The receiver caught some flak last week for sitting by himself with his headphones on at Robert Kraft's charity gala, where he also refused autograph requests. After his comments on Monday, things might be getting a bit worse.

"When you have done so much and put so much work in, it kind of feels like I am not wanted," he said in an exclusive interview with CBSSports.com.

It's not the first time that Moss has spoken about his contract, but he's taking a significantly sharper tone than when he spoke in February.

"I am taking that in stride and playing my final year out and whatever the future holds is what it holds," he told CBSSports.com "But it is kind of a bad feeling — feeling not wanted. It is not like my production has gone down."

In February, Moss told the Boston Herald that he believed 2010 would be his final season with New England, adding that the Patriots "don't really pay" despite the fact that the team gave him a three-year, $27 million contract following the 2007 season.

Kraft later defended the team, laying out the details of Moss' contract. That apparently has not made Moss feel any better.

"I am a little older and understand the nature of the business," he told CBSSports. "The older you get, the more your skills supposedly diminish, but I think I am getting wiser in how to use my physical skills. That's the frustrating part when you put so much heart and desire into things and feel like you are not wanted."

Moss added that his feelings were not necessarily those of Tom Brady, who is also in the final year of his contract.

"I am speaking from an individual standpoint," he said. "I don't know about Tom's or whoever else's contract."

Much of the hubbub this summer was spent speculating on how upset the quarterback must be that his deal is expiring at season's end. He hasn't complained, but his top receiver is sending a loud and clear message that he's not happy.

Of course, it's not the first issue Moss has ever had in his career. The fan bases in Minnesota and Oakland (for his first year there, at least) could let them slide — so long as he could produce on Sundays. There's no reason to expect Moss to drop off in production in this upcoming contract year, but the good old days of a happy Randy Moss could very well be history.