Report: Gregg Williams Promised $15,000 Reward to Injure Former Quarterback Brad Johnson

The NFL might have reprimanded the New Orleans Saints for their bounty system Wednesday, but it doesn't appear that the story is going away anytime soon.

Report: Gregg Williams Promised $15,000 Reward to Injure Former Quarterback Brad JohnsonAccording to CBS Sports, back in the Redskins' 2006 Monday Night Football game against Minnesota, then-defensive coordinator Gregg Williams promised a hefty reward to whichever player took out Vikings quarterback Brad Johnson, who reportedly had bad blood with Redskins owner Dan Snyder.

"Gregg came in and dropped $15,000 on the [table] and said, 'Brad Johnson doesn't finish this game. This is Wednesday and the money will go up later in the week. It could double or triple by the end of the week,'" one player, who asked to remain anonymous, said. "A couple of guys kinda got excited. [Defensive line coach] Greg Blache said, 'If you get fined, it will be taken care of.'"

A second player, who also asked to remain anonymous, said Williams had made a similar request in the team's playoff game against the Seattle Seahawks the year before — only this time, the target was MVP running back Shaun Alexander.

Alexander did in fact leave the game with an injury, although the player said it wasn't the result of a dirty play.

"Now it happened that [linebacker LaVar Arrington) knocked Shaun out of the game, but he was just playing hard," he said. "Unless it's a free shot at the quarterback, you have a really hard time trying to hurt a guy when you’re making a play on the ball."

"We just wanted to go out and play hard," the player added. "We weren't looking to injure a guy.  But Gregg's one of the best defensive coaches in football and a great motivator. Players are very loyal to him. He probably had an effect on the young guys like [late safety) Sean Taylor, who he had drafted so high and who he really believed in."

It was announced on Wednesday, that Williams will be suspended indefinitely by the NFL.