Former Buffalo Bills Cheerleaders Sue Team Over Pay, Poor Treatment

bills cheerBUFFALO, N.Y. — Five former Buffalo Bills cheerleaders on Tuesday sued the team over a pay system they say had them working hundreds of hours for free at games and at mandatory public appearances at which they were subjected to groping and sexual comments.

The case against the Bills says its cheerleaders, the Buffalo Jills, are wrongly classified as independent contractors and are subjected to policies that violate the state’s $8 per hour minimum wage law and other workplace rules.

The Bills’ cheerleaders aren’t paid for games or practices and have to make 20-35 appearances, most of which are unpaid, at community and charity events each season, the lawsuit said. On top of that, they have to pay $650 for their uniforms and are not reimbursed for travel or other expenses, the cheerleaders said.

The time and expense, and rules governing their personal lives, far exceeded what they signed on for, the women said.

The civil action, which seeks unspecified back pay and legal fees, names Stejon Productions Corp., which assumed management of the Jills in 2011, along with former manager Citadel Communications Co. and the Buffalo Bills.

Stejon President Stephanie Mateczun said she could not comment on the claims. Buffalo Bills spokesman Scott Berchtold said the team’s policy is not to discuss pending litigation. A Citadel spokesman could not be reached for comment.

Mateczun, the cheerleaders said, controlled everything from their hair and nail polish color to what they could post on Facebook.

“Everything from standing in front of us with a clipboard having us do a jiggle test to see what parts of our body were jiggling,” cheerleader Alyssa U. said, “and if that was something that she saw, you were getting benched.”

Alyssa U. estimated she was paid a total of $420 during the 2012-13 football season. Another cheerleader, Maria P., said she received $105.